John Cage

Blind in a Good Way: The Cunningham Mesostics as Love Poems

As I have noted in a previous entry, it has become typical to read the Cunningham mesostics as experimental love poems. Andy Weaver, in “Writing Through Merce: John Cage’s Silence, Differends, and Avant-Garde Idioms,” argues that the sequence “openly enacts Cage’s love for Cunningham” since the poems both “show Cage’s intimate knowledge of Cunningham’s aesthetics … Continue reading

Noisy Inging: The “62 Mesostics re Merce Cunningham” as Anti-Exegesis
John Cage

Noisy Inging: The “62 Mesostics re Merce Cunningham” as Anti-Exegesis

Cage’s oft-overlooked poetic sequence, “62 Mesostics re Merce Cunningham,” is written entirely in what my last entry described as “noise” – in particular, sematic noise, in which the semantic sense that would be conveyed by the convergence of phonemes and morphemes is disrupted. The sequence is made up of sixty-two mesostic poems (a mesostic is … Continue reading

Appendices / Introduction

Appendix(n): A Treatise on the Dissertation Form

As a digital, hypertextual project, my dissertation is made up of twelve sections (you are approaching the end of the first, there will be one more for each primary author). Each section is approximately twenty-five to thirty print-pages, and each shares three primary concerns: how is authorship contrived, complicated, or restricted? how is the commonality … Continue reading