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Robert Duncan

“Do you know the old language?”: Passages as Anarchist Intervention

In 2008, when Andy Weaver published his article “Promoting ‘a community of thoughtful men and women’: Anarchism in Robert Duncan’s Ground Work Volumes” in ESC: English Studies in Canada, he noted that “when it comes to Duncan’s poetry, [the] underlying political anarchism often goes unnoticed” (75). Weaver points to Duncan scholars Norman Finkelstein and Nathaniel […]

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Robert Duncan

“O weaver, weaver”: Disapperance and (Un)Integration in the Passages

When I write about Duncan’s assertion, in “Notes on Notation,” that the poems in the Passages series “are but passages of a poem beyond that calls itself Passages” and that they ultimately “belong to the unfolding revelation of a Sentence beyond the work” (5), I do not mean to suggest that these poems, while dispersed […]

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Robert Duncan

“When the words he wrote / were his”: Robert Duncan and Communal Language

                                                   Robert Duncan told me his poetry was picked up from other people.     The only time he felt, he said, like using quotation marks was when the words he wrote were his. (John Cage, “Diary: How to Improve the World (You Will Only    Make Matters Worse) Continued 1968 (Revised)”13) Robert Duncan’s Passages seems, to me, […]

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Robert Duncan

Can’t Buy Me Love: Robert Duncan and the Poetics of Communal Love

I’ve titled this section after the famous Beatles song, not because there is an intertext between Robert Duncan and the Beatles (if there is, I haven’t found it), but because it is a major feature of Duncan’s Passages series of poems, a series that punctuates his well-known collection, Bending the Bow and his final work, […]

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Appendices

Post Delay

There will be no post this week as I prepare my research for the new sections on Robert Duncan and Denise Levertov. Please excuse my absence this week, and be sure to check back next week when my new posts will resume. Thanks for your patience.