John Cage

No Authors: Postanarchist Solutions for Practical Reading/Writing

Most Often Misunderstood: Cage’s Use of Chance As I have suggested earlier, with the exception of the recently published articles by Weaver and Braune, the only author to give more attention than a few sentences to the Cunningham mesostics is Cage’s fellow poet Jackson Mac Low, who writes of this sequence, albeit still quite briefly, … Continue reading

John Cage

Blind in a Good Way: The Cunningham Mesostics as Love Poems

As I have noted in a previous entry, it has become typical to read the Cunningham mesostics as experimental love poems. Andy Weaver, in “Writing Through Merce: John Cage’s Silence, Differends, and Avant-Garde Idioms,” argues that the sequence “openly enacts Cage’s love for Cunningham” since the poems both “show Cage’s intimate knowledge of Cunningham’s aesthetics … Continue reading

Noisy Inging: The “62 Mesostics re Merce Cunningham” as Anti-Exegesis
John Cage

Noisy Inging: The “62 Mesostics re Merce Cunningham” as Anti-Exegesis

Cage’s oft-overlooked poetic sequence, “62 Mesostics re Merce Cunningham,” is written entirely in what my last entry described as “noise” – in particular, sematic noise, in which the semantic sense that would be conveyed by the convergence of phonemes and morphemes is disrupted. The sequence is made up of sixty-two mesostic poems (a mesostic is … Continue reading